College News

College News News

FSU faculty expert discusses Florida's fragile homeowners-insurance market

A recent news report said about 70,000 Florida policyholders will lose their homeowners insurance just as the Atlantic hurricane season begins. "It's a crisis," said Charles Nyce, the Robert L. Atkins Associate Professor in the Florida State University College of Business who specializes in catastrophic-risk financing and corporate-risk management. "It's not a crisis from the Florida homeowner's position, yet — but it's a crisis in the insurance market, for sure."


FSU expert sees Bitcoin as continued alternative investment but no future rival to Visa, Mastercard

Guangzhi Shang, a cryptocurrency expert in Florida State University's College of Business, offers no prediction on the value or use of Bitcoin, but he doesn't see it soon rivaling credit and debit cards in everyday purchases.


'Our legacy' inspires alumnus' gifts to Legacy Hall

When Andy Norman thinks about Florida State University – and he thinks about FSU a lot – he reflects on 1997 when he graduated with a degree in social science and a minor in business.


Seneff Scholar embraces her next step: Harvard Law School

Cierra McKenzie aspires to become a lawyer who works at the forefront of innovation of business and technology. She honed that drive as a Seneff Scholar in the Florida State University College of Business, and she will begin to see it through this fall at Harvard Law School.


Alumnus and major donor recalls 'perils' of late-1970s Iran

Long before he became an author and a major supporter of the Florida State University College of Business, alumnus Barry Anderson bore witness to one of the most harrowing ordeals in U.S. history.


'Confidence' from accounting degree inspires major gift for Legacy Hall

His work as an investment-industry executive and later as an adjunct professor took him to places all over the globe. And whether in San Francisco, London or Mumbai, Peter Jones would put on his Florida State University garb and feel the world get smaller. "Invariably, someone would walk past me and say, 'Go Noles!'" Jones said.


FSU MBA program touts Top 10, Top 30 standings

Florida State University's MBA specialty in real estate retained its Top 10 status, and its Part-time MBA format broke into the Top 30 among public schools nationwide, according to U.S. News & World Report's 2023 list of best on-campus graduate programs released today. Repeating its No. 9 standing among public schools, FSU's MBA specialty in real estate also improved one spot to No. 16 among private and public schools combined.


Bruning Speaker Series: Alumnus shares his NASCAR ride

Before he shifted into gear, Daryl Wolfe braced students for what he suggested would be a detailed presentation that typically took about 6 ½ hours. He was kidding, of course, so he quickly fessed up. And buckled up. "I'm in the racing business," Wolfe said with a smile about the true pace of his presentations. "We like to move fast."


Marketing professor focuses on 'the greater good'

Ethics. Inclusivity. Societal well-being. Maura Scott makes those concepts the focus of her award-winning research into, among other topics, ways in which organizations can simultaneously increase profits and make life better for their customers, particularly those from vulnerable populations. Scott, the Persis E. Rockwood Professor of Marketing in the College of Business, says her approach reflects her vision of using "rigorous, inclusive scholarly research to help improve consumers' financial and health decision-making and well-being, and to underscore the role firms can play in advancing the greater good."


Finance expert: Fed had to respond to high inflation

Soaring inflation and its threat to the U.S. economy gave the Federal Reserve no choice but to raise interest rates this week and to signal further increases in the coming months, said William Christiansen, longtime chair of the finance department in Florida State University's College of Business. "There's pretty much unanimous agreement that they have to raise rates," said Christiansen, referring to the Fed's rate-setting Federal Open Market Committee, or FOMC. "Rates are at historic lows, and they've been that low for a long time. Now inflation is very high, and the Fed has to respond."